Kookoolan Farms

Kookoolan Farms is a pasture-based, diversified small family farm in Yamhill, Oregon, founded in October 2005, much more like the small family farms of 100 years ago than a modern farm. Although iconically known for our pasture-raised chickens (available seasonally at New Seasons Markets), Kookoolan Farms also offers pasture-raised beef, pork, lamb, turkey, ducks; eggs from pasture-raised hens; and raw milk from pasture-raised Jersey cows. The farm also offers the Northwest’s largest and most complete selection of cheesemaking supplies, ingredients, starters, and equipment, and offers cheesemaking classes almost every Saturday. Everything is direct-marketed to individual families. Kookoolan Farms has been recognized in The Oregonian’s FoodDay, Food and Wine Magazine, Sunset Magazine, Culture Magazine, USA Today, and Cooking Light Magazine.

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Notes:
Our self-service honor store is open 365 days a year, 8am to 6pm. Because of its unique, unstaffed, self-service nature, we ask that you phone ahead for your first visit. One of us will be happy to spend a few minutes with you in the store answering your questions and showing you how things are organized, how to pay us, and how to return your empty jars and bottles. After that you are welcome to shop anytime at your pleasure, no appointment required. (You're always welcome to phone ahead to verify we have your desired items in stock -- we do "get it" that it's a long drive to Yamhill!) (503) 730-7535

Find this Farm

(503) 730-7535

[email protected]

15713 Highway 47, Yamhill, Or, 97148

45.330578, -123.183711

45° 19′ 50″ N, 45° 19′ 50″ N

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Street View

Hours of Operation

Sunday 8:00 am ~ 6:00 pm
Monday 8:00 am ~ 6:00 pm
Tuesday 8:00 am ~ 6:00 pm
Wednesday 8:00 am ~ 6:00 pm
Thursday 8:00 am ~ 6:00 pm
Friday 8:00 am ~ 6:00 pm
Saturday 8:00 am ~ 6:00 pm

* see Notes above

Products

Bacon 12 / lb.
Available Now
Jan 1st ~ Dec 31st
Beef 4.5 / lb.
We butcher 3-4 beefs a month, 11 months of the year, and they must be reserved in advance, while the animal is still alive. We are generally reserving about two months ahead of time. You are welcome to reserve 1/8th, 1/4th, or 1/2 for any preferred timing; it is never too early to reserve for your preferred date. In 2011, beef halves ranged in weight from 260 to 360 pounds, with most coming in between 310-340 lbs. (divide by two for quarter weight; divide by four for 1/8th weight). We offer five sizes/options, email us for next availability date.: (1) A “regular” 1/8th beef share is about 85 pounds hanging weight (equals about 60 pounds finished weight) at $4.50 per pound, or about $350-$400 total cost. (For a split quarter, you’d order 2/8ths of a beef, obviously for twice the cost and getting twice the meat described here. There is a $0.25 per pound discount for ordering a quarter, or $4.25 per pound processed hanging weight.) You’d get an assortment of cuts from both the front and rear of the animal, including about 20 percent steaks, 20 percent roasts, 35 percent ground meat (or about 21 pounds ground meat plus about 3 pounds stew meat), and miscellaneous other cuts including cross-cut shanks, brisket, short ribs, spare ribs, stew meat, etc. It’s about 60 pounds of finished meat, about 2.5 cubic feet of freezer space. There is NOT the option for custom cutting for a 1/8th share. (2) A “split quarter” includes meat from both the front and rear of the beef. This is the exact equivalent of two 1/8ths shares (options 1), obviously for about twice the cost and getting twice the meat described above, or about $700-$800 total cost, about 120 pounds of finished meat, and requiring about 4 to 5 cubic feet of freezer space. We offer a $0.25 per pound discount for ordering a quarter, or $4.25 per pound processed hanging weight. (3) front quarter of one animal. Most of the high-value steaks are in the rear quarter, so we sell rear quarters for $1 more a pound, and front quarters for $1 less. A typical front quarter would be about 170 pounds hanging weight (equals about 120 pounds finished weight), $3.50 per pound, about $600 total cost. The front quarter is mostly roasts (prime rib roast or steaks, cross-cut rib roast, pot roast, and brisket; plus short ribs and spare ribs; and cross-cut shanks for osso buco. You can choose to keep just your favorite roasts and have the rest cut into stew meat and ground meat if you choose. Since this is a self-contained “primal cut” you can choose to have it cut however you wish to your own specifications. (4) rear quarter. This is $1 a pound more, or $5.50 per pound hanging weight, about 170 pounds hanging weight (again about 120 pounds finished weight), about $900 total cost. A rear quarter, which again can be cut to your own specifications if you desire, will yield about 2/3rds premium steaks (tenderloin, porterhouse, t-bone, and sirloin steaks) and about 1/3rd stew meat and/or ground meat. (5) Half or “side” of beef. This is the weight equivalent of four 1/8th shares, and includes literally everything on one side of the backbone. This can be cut and processed to your own order. We offer a $0.50 per pound discount for halves, or $4/lb processed hanging weight. A typical half beef is about 330 pounds hanging weight, about 240 pounds of finished meat, or about 9 cubic feet of freezer space and about $1300 total cost. For any of the options you can request soup bones and organ meats too, at no additional charge. For option (1) 1/8th beef, we request a $50 deposit; for options (2) (3 or (4) for 1/4th beef, a $100 deposit; for option (5) 1/2 beef a $200 deposit. For options (1) and (2) you do not get to specify cuts. For options (3) (4) or (5) you will be provided with options and instructions for calling your own processing instructions in to our butcher.
Available Now
Jan 1st ~ Dec 31st
Cheesemaking Classes
April 14: Mozzarella 101 1pm to 4pm (Scott). We start with our own liquid raw cow milk, and in less than an hour you'll have hands-on experience kneading and forming the curd. This class does not have a brought-in cheese tasting plate because you'll be eating the cheese you make in the class, along with fresh tomatoes and basil grown right here on Kookoolan Farms and picked the day of the class! In this class you will have hands-on experience and instruction making fresh mozzarella from liquid milk. You will participate in kneading and shaping cheese, and you’ll get to enjoy eating the cheese too! $60 per person, SOLD OUT with a standby list, next offered July 21. April 21: Goat Cheeses 1pm to 4pm (Scott) A perennial favorite, one of our most popular classes. Learn chevre of course, but also other cheeses and dairy products from goat's milk, and the differences generally in working with goat's milk versus that of other species. $70/person THIS CLASS IS FULL, STANDBY NAMES ACCEPTED, NEXT OFFERED IN 2013. Saturday, April 28, 2012, 1PM to 4PM: Mold-Ripened Soft Cheeses/Bries and Blues (Mary) $65/person. Covers the basics of fresh drained cheeses, and introduces the next step of using surface molds to ripen your cheese. You'll learn how to make Brie, creamy roquefort-style blue cheese, and drier Danish style blue cheese. The cheese tasting plate for this class is particularly divine. $75 per person, SORRY, FULL/CLOSED with a standby list, next offered July 7 2012. Saturday, May 5, 2012, 1PM to 4PM: INTRODUCTION TO HARD CHEESES/FETA FEAST! (Mary Rosenblum). This popular class is our most basic introduction to making hard cheeses. Feta is the quickest and easiest of all hard cheeses, and is a great transition from making soft fresh cheeses (very easy) into making pressed hard cheeses (more difficult than soft cheeses, plus for aged cheeses you have to wait a long time to find out whether you got good results). Feta was perhaps one of the earliest cheeses to have been developed, but is not as well known in the U.S. as some other cheeses. This class will teach you not only how to make this cheese, but also how to serve and enjoy it. Enjoy a meza plate of middle eastern appetizers along with a sampling of several different fresh and aged fetas. No pre-requisite, no cheesemaking experience required, ideal introductory class for anyone wanting to try making hard cheeses at home. Bonus: This class also includes how to make cottage cheese! $70 per person SPACE AVAILABLE, class is about half filled. May 12: Soft Cheeses 101, 1pm to 4pm (Scott). One of our most popular classes, the ideal beginner's introduction to cheesemaking. Soft fresh cheeses are instant gratification! Learn chevre, fromage blanc, cream cheese, ice cream, and an introduction to surface-ripened soft cheeses such as brie. $70 per person. SPACE AVAILABLE, class is about half filled. May 19: placeholder Saturday, May 26, 2012, 1pm to 4pm: Bread and Butter, Grains and Flour (taught by MaryAnn Jasper of Green Willow Grain Farm). This class is perfect for any home baker who is willing to experiment. You’ll learn fast, easy recipes anybody can do in any kitchen, even with limited time and/or space. You’ll learn that what holds in cooking also holds in baking: use great ingredients and it won’t turn out badly! The focus is on the ingredients. Your family will love the wonderful baking aromas wafting from your kitchen more frequently! Greenwillow Grains, the sales side of Stalford Family Farm outside Tangent, Oregon, http://www.greenwillowgrains.com/, mills and distributes its estate-grown, certified organic flours to natural food stores and co-ops as well as upscale restaurants and artisanal bakeries throughout the Willamette Valley. This class puts the focus of baking on its primary ingredient: flour. You’ll learn all about flour, including the difference between pastry flour and bread flour, and how to use each of these in everyday recipes. You’ll learn how to select and store flour, and even how to blend your own all-purpose flour to your own preferences, with a confident understanding of the trade-offs in texture. You’ll also learn about production of the red and white wheats from which flours are made, and the qualities of fresh local flour. In this class we’ll make coffee cake or fruit cobbler using pastry flour; scones using all-purpose flour; and overnight rolls using bread flour. We’ll use locally sourced ingredients, including eggs, milk and cream from Kookoolan Farms. The class will also work together to make fresh raw butter, and we’ll talk about several different sourdough starters from Cultures for Health. Your class fee covers all instruction, an assortment of baked goods to eat in class or take home, a 3-pound bag of local organic pastry flour ($5.50 value), a 3-pound bag of local organic bread flour ($5.50 value), and a $10 coupon good toward the purchase of anything Kookoolan Farms sells, including organic Greenwillow bread and pastry flours, and the full range of sourdough starters from Cultures for Health. $45 per person, SOLD OUT, waitlist names accepted, please do let us know if you're interested in this class and we can put together another date for summer 2012. We're also working on putting together a gluten-free baking class. Saturday, June 9, 2012, 1PM to 4PM, Washed Curd Cheeses (Rudy Marchesi). This category of popular cheeses includes Gouda, havarti, and Colby, which are all made using the "washed curd" technique. This class is perfectly suited for beginners, for gouda lovers, and for folks who have already made cheese a few times. Rudy has been making Gouda-style cheese for years, having taken a one-on-one class from a Gouda Master on the East Coast several years ago. Rudy is the owner and winemaker of Montinore Estates Vineyard, and always brings a generous sampling of his wines to complement our extravagant gourmet cheese tasting plate as well. $70/person SPACE AVAILABLE June 16: placeholder June 23: Home Creamery, 1pm to 4pm (Scott). Learn how to make butter, sour cream, creme fraiche, ice cream, yogurt, kefir, soft fresh cheeses including cottage cheese, and culturing milk generally. A great introductory class that will give you the confidence to safely make these great products at home in your own kitchen! $60/person SPACE AVAILABLE June 30: Artisanal Cheddar 201, 1pm to 4pm (Scott) $75/person SPACE AVAILABLE Saturday, July 7, 2012, 1PM to 4PM: Surface-Ripened Cheeses: Reds, Whites and Blues! (Mary). Covers the basics of fresh drained cheeses, and introduces the next step of using surface molds to ripen your cheese. You'll learn how to make Brie, creamy roquefort-style blue cheese, and drier Danish style blue cheese, plus "Stinky Cheeses" made using Bacteria Linens, the "red mold". The cheese tasting plate for this class is particularly divine. $75 per person, SPACE AVAILABLE July 14: Private chartered class. July 21: Mozzarella 101, 1pm to 4pm (Scott). We start with our own liquid raw cow milk, and in less than an hour you'll have hands-on experience kneading and forming the curd. This class does not have a brought-in cheese tasting plate because you'll be eating the cheese you make in the class, along with fresh tomatoes and basil grown right here on Kookoolan Farms and picked the day of the class! In this class you will have hands-on experience and instruction making fresh mozzarella from liquid milk. You will participate in kneading and shaping cheese, and you’ll get to enjoy eating the cheese too! $60 per person SPACE AVAILABLE Jul 28: placeholder Aug 4: Mozzarella 101, 1pm to 4pm (Scott). We start with our own liquid raw cow milk, and in less than an hour you'll have hands-on experience kneading and forming the curd. This class does not have a brought-in cheese tasting plate because you'll be eating the cheese you make in the class, along with fresh tomatoes and basil grown right here on Kookoolan Farms and picked the day of the class! In this class you will have hands-on experience and instruction making fresh mozzarella from liquid milk. You will participate in kneading and shaping cheese, and you’ll get to enjoy eating the cheese too! $65 per person SPACE AVAILABLE Aug 11 Home Creamery, 1pm to 4pm (Scott). Learn how to make butter, sour cream, creme fraiche, ice cream, yogurt, kefir, soft fresh cheeses including cottage cheese, and culturing milk generally. A great introductory class that will give you the confidence to safely make these great products at home in your own kitchen! $65/person SPACE AVAILABLE Saturday, Aug 18, 2012, 1PM to 4PM: INTRODUCTION TO HARD CHEESES/FETA FEAST! (Mary Rosenblum). This popular class is our most basic introduction to making hard cheeses. Feta is the quickest and easiest of all hard cheeses, and is a great transition from making soft fresh cheeses (very easy) into making pressed hard cheeses (more difficult than soft cheeses, plus for aged cheeses you have to wait a long time to find out whether you got good results). Feta was perhaps one of the earliest cheeses to have been developed, but is not as well known in the U.S. as some other cheeses. This class will teach you not only how to make this cheese, but also how to serve and enjoy it. Enjoy a meza plate of middle eastern appetizers along with a sampling of several different fresh and aged fetas. No pre-requisite, no cheesemaking experience required, ideal introductory class for anyone wanting to try making hard cheeses at home. Bonus: This class also includes how to make cottage cheese! $70 per person, SPACE AVAILABLE Aug 25: Soft Cheeses 101, 1pm to 4pm (Scott). One of our most popular classes, the ideal beginner's introduction to cheesemaking. Soft fresh cheeses are instant gratification! Learn chevre, fromage blanc, cream cheese, ice cream, and an introduction to surface-ripened soft cheeses such as brie. $70 per person. SPACE AVAILABLE Sep 8: placeholder Thurs, Sep 13: Private chartered class. Sep 15: Soft 201: Surface Ripened Soft Cheeses, 1pm to 4pm (Scott) $70/person SPACE AVAILABLE Saturday, Sep 22, 2012, 1PM to 4PM: Italian Hard Cheeses (Rudy). Enjoy an afternoon of wine and cheese. Local winemaker Rudy Marchesi owns Montinore Estates Winery in Dilley, Oregon. Learn the art of cheesemaking and enjoy a selection of Montinore's biodynamically produced and certified wines, plus a cheese tasting plate of eight fine imported Italian hard cheeses. Learn the techniques that will enable you to make Asiago, Parmiggiano, Romano, and many other favorites at home, for far less than the cost of buying the finished aged cheeses. $75/person, SPACE AVAILABLE Saturday, Sep 29, 10AM to 4PM: Advanced Cheese Theory (Mary). This is an all-day class that runs from 10AM to 4PM and includes breakfast, coffee, full lunch of all-Kookoolan ingredients, and extravagant cheese tasting (which you'll be walked through by Mary Rosenblum). Come hungry, and expect to leave full! This class takes you beyond following a cheese recipe out of a book. You will learn the processes going on in that pot of milk as the enzymes in rennet coagulate the milk and the curd becomes a ripe and flavorful cheese. The demonstration cheese for this class is Burrata, a stuffed mozzarella. Understanding the relationship of proteins in the milk, the butterfat, and what the culture bacteria you added are actually doing, will give you a much better understanding of your results, both good results and not so good results. You’ll begin to understand how to make changes that will give you the texture and flavor you really want in your finished cheeses. We’ll examine those processes in a hands-on way as we make an English-style cheddar, trouble shoot less-than-perfect cheeses, and experiment to create a new type of artisanal mozzarella. You’ll have a chance to use both a pH meter and titration equipment to see for yourself how quickly the bacteria in the cheese pot create the acid that makes your cheese a cheese. Bring cheese you have made, both your outstanding examples to participate in a cheese contest with a small prize from Kookoolan Farms, and bring the less -than-perfect results where you could use a bit of help understanding what happened and how to make it better next time. The class includes a cheese tasting plate featuring examples of the major types of cheeses as well as an excellent lunch prepared from all-Kookoolan ingredients. $95 per person, SPACE AVAILABLE Oct 6: Basic Hard Cheeses/Cheddar 101, 1pm to 4pm (Scott) $70/person, SPACE AVAILABLE Oct 13: Mozzarella 101, 1pm to 4pm (Scott). We start with our own liquid raw cow milk, and in less than an hour you'll have hands-on experience kneading and forming the curd. This class does not have a brought-in cheese tasting plate because you'll be eating the cheese you make in the class, along with fresh tomatoes and basil grown right here on Kookoolan Farms and picked the day of the class! In this class you will have hands-on experience and instruction making fresh mozzarella from liquid milk. You will participate in kneading and shaping cheese, and you’ll get to enjoy eating the cheese too! $65 per person SPACE AVAILABLE Oct 20: Milk soaps, 1pm to 3pm (Kristin). Just in time for preparing for holiday gift giving, luxury handmade milk soaps make beautiful, thoughtful gifts. Easier and less expensive than you'd think and oh so satisfying to be able to do it yourself! You'll learn safe handling, needed equipment, where to buy ingredients and supplies. Kristin will make a batch of soap from scratch while you watch! You'll be able to take home two bars of soap and a complete handbook written by Kristin. Simple hot-process soap making lets you complete your soapmaking in only two hours. Learn hot process soap making. Make your own soap and use it tonight: with hot process soapmaking there is no waiting several weeks for your soap to "cure." Make your own soap with all-natural ingredients including milk. The make-it-yourself price works out to about $1.50 material cost per bar for natural, homemade soaps. Great for allergies and sensitive skin, and great as a thoughtful, handmade gift for the holidays or having on hand for last-minute gift-giving year-round. Your instructor is a safety-conscious mother of young children, and she will also share her tips for sourcing, buying and (not!) storing the highly caustic lye used in all soapmaking. Kristin's handmade soaps are also available for sale in our farmstore. $60/person SPACE AVAILABLE Sat, Oct 27, 5pm to 8pm: How To Make Mead (Doug) Kookoolan Farms is also a fully-licensed winery. Doug Remington, manager of Main Street Homebrew Supply Store in Hillsboro, Oregon, is consulting meadmaker at Kookoolan Farms, currently authoring a new book on meadmaking that will be released in about a year, and is a fifteen-years-plus friend of Farmer Chrissie. Mead has historically been made by just about every culture on earth: a common, joyous, ancient thread shared by all cultures and societies all over the earth, each with our own spin on wines made from honey. Mead is just a genre, as beer or wine are genres: mead is any alcohol produced from honey as the primary source of fermentable sugar. Mead can be sweet or dry, sparkling or still, weak or strong in terms of alcohol content, and flavored with hundreds of fruit, herb or spice adjuncts. Grape juice mixed with honey, called pyment, is a time-honored tradition in many countries, and here in Oregon's wine country you can count on pinot noir pyments coming from Kookoolan. A “melomel” is mead made with any combination of honey and any kind of fruit juice, where the fruit juice is not just a flavoring after the fact but is part of the fermentable must; apples, cherries, and apricots are three of the most popular blends. Nobody knows the archaic words “sack” mead or “sack” wine anymore (meaning strong alcohol and sugar): these are sherry-style, or liqueur-style, or dessert-wine styles which are closest to my favorite meads. The best European meads are aged for five years or more in oak barrels, and Kookoolan World Meadery will definitely be producing a straight-up, oak-aged mead. The Picts, a particular tribe in Scotland, made a mead with heather blossoms; heather bitters the nectar much as hops do for beer, but in addition a wild fungus grows on the heather blossoms that produces a slightly psychotropic effect on the drinker. Queen Elizabeth’s favorite mead used bay leaves, thyme, rose petals, and lemon balm. In our class Doug will turn a bucket of honey into fermenting mead right before your eyes! This class includes detailed handouts enabling you to make mead at home, plus Doug will walk you through a generous tasting of a half dozen or so commercial and homebrew meads. $70/person includes tasting a $10 coupon good toward the purchase of anything from Kookoolan Farms. SPACE AVAILABLE, MUST BE 21. Saturday, Nov 3, 1PM to 4PM: Cheddar 201, Artisanal Cheddar (Mary). We start with our own liquid raw cow milk, and by the end of the class, the cheese will be finished and in the press. Your instructor is Mary Rosenblum, local science fiction author, cheesemaker, and cheese judge. This class has a great cheese tasting plate, with eight different cheddars: local and imported, flavored and straight, young and well-aged, even one made from goat milk. You will learn the old-fashioned Real Cheddaring process, using traditional techniques, a step up in taste and complexity from simple farmhouse cheddar recipes. The class also covers the basics of making any kind of hard cheese. Our Cheddar 101 Basic Cheddar class is recommended but not required. Bonus: This class also includes how to make cottage cheese! $75 per person, SPACE AVAILABLE Saturday, Nov 10, 2012, 1PM to 4PM: Sausage: Fresh and dry-cured (Rudy). How to stuff and season. Make and cook patties and links, and then make salami and maybe pork/fish sausage. This class is suitable for beginners. You'll taste several different homemade and artisan cured meats, and you'll get to take own your own curing pork belly for finishing at home as DIY bacon. $80 per person, SPACE AVAILABLE, this class is already about half filled. Saturday, Dec 1, 2012, 1PM to 4PM: Mozzarella 201 (Mary). This class is a step up in complexity and flavor from the basic quick-method handmade mozzarella. We start with handmade curd from our own raw cow milk, refrigerated overnight, and you'll have hands-on experience kneading and forming the curd using traditional, artisanal, slower methods. This class does not have a brought-in cheese tasting plate because you'll be eating the cheese you make today, along with fresh bread, cured meats, and other goodies! Highly recommended for beginners. Our Mozzarella 101 class is not a prerequisite. $65 per person, SPACE AVAILABLE Dec 8: Basic Soft Cheeses, 1pm to 4pm (Scott). One of our most popular classes, the ideal beginner's introduction to cheesemaking. Soft fresh cheeses are instant gratification! Learn chevre, fromage blanc, cream cheese, ice cream, and an introduction to surface-ripened soft cheeses such as brie. $70 per person. SPACE AVAILABLE Due to past experience with the vagaries of winter storms in Oregon causing last-minute cancellations, we do not offer classes from December 15 through January 31 each year. ABOUT THE LOCATION: Kookoolan Farms is a diversified, small family farm in Yamhill, Oregon. We raise chickens for meat and for eggs, cows for milk and for meat, and raise vegetables in 5,000 linear feet of 4-foot-wide raised beds. We are also a meadery and kombuchery. We offer a full line of cheesemaking ingredients, cultures and supplies from the New England Cheesemaking Supply Company and from Mad Millie’s Cheesemaking Supplies. www.kookoolanfarms.com We gladly accept check, cash, Visa, Mastercard, Discover and debit cards. We do ask you to pay in advance for classes.
Available Now
Feb 1st ~ Nov 15th
Cheesemaking Supplies
Cheesemaking Supplies We carry the Northwest's largest and most complete selection of Cheesemaking Ingredients, Cultures, Supplies, and Equipment for the home cheesemaker, including products from the New England Cheesemaking Supply Company, Urban Cheesecraft, Mad Millie, Cultures for Health, Glengarry Creamery, and several independent products! Our self-service farmstore is open daily 8am to 6pm, for your first visit only, we ask that you call to make an appointment, (503) 730-7535. New England Cheesemaking Supply Company blogged about us on October 3, 2010: http://cheesemakinghelp.blogspot.com NEW! "Blessed Are the Cheesemakers" T-shirt, S-M-L-XL-XXL, $22 each Call or email us with your order, (503) 730-7535, or [email protected], and we can send it to you by Priority Mail. We are also at the Hillsdale Farmer's Market in southwest Portland, 10AM-2PM, every other Sunday from May 6, 2012 through November 18, 2012. (see www.hillsdalefarmersmarket.com forlocation, and directions). Please see our Classes and Events page for upcoming cheesemaking classes! We offer: CULTURES Culture Name Recommended Uses Price Home Creamery Fresh C3 Five individual packets each make one quart of starter culture. Produces cottage cheese, pot cheese, meufchatel, and other soft cheeses. $6 Kefir C45 Kefir has been called the "Champagne of dairy products". Produces a rich, creamy, tangy drink. It can be sweetened and produces a refreshing and nutritious dairy treat. Contains two individual packets, each making up to one gallon of mother culture. May be re-cultured. Repeated reculturing will eventually grow the fabled "kefir grains." $6 Viili Yogurt Starter YS100 Scandinavian culture. GREAT flavor. $13 Filmjolk Starter YS101 Scandinavian culture. GREAT flavor. $13 Piima Culture YS103 Scandinavian culture. GREAT flavor. $13 Ricki's Sour Cream C30 will turn a quart of cream into deliciously thick "old world" style sour cream. Use milk to make a creamy lower-fat substitute; drain the cultured cream to make a thicker sour cream with a texture more like store-bought. Directions included. Five packets; each sets a quart of cream or milk. $6 Crème Fraiche C33 Add to cream or half-and-half to produce a delicious crème fraiche that can be served fresh or used in cooking. Great on baked potatoes or cooked cabbage. Five individual packets; each sets up to one quart of cream. When drained it produces a creamy mascarpone cheese. This culture includes rennet. $6 Buttermilk C21 Produce thick, old-fashioned, living New England-style buttermilk that can be made with skim or whole milk. Real buttermilk makes killer-good pancakes, biscuits and scones. Five individual packets; each will set one quart of milk. $6 Mesophilic Family Mesophilic Direct Set C1 Five individual packets each makes one quart of mother culture. Produces cheddar, Monterey, Jack, Stilton, Edam, Gouda, Muenster, Blue, Farmhouse and other hard cheeses. $6 Flora Danica Reculturable packet contains enough for up to 50 gallons of milk! Kosher. Aromatic culture produces a variety of cheeses including Fresh Chevre, Camembert, Feta and Blue Cheeses. $16 Fromage Blanc Direct Set C20 This is the easiest, most wonderful discovery ever. So simple even a child can make it. The result is similar to cream cheese with a delightful rich flavor. You can make it from skim, whole, or cream. Fromage blanc can be used in dips, in cooking or simply spread on your morning bagel. Add flavors or roll in crushed nuts or herbs to make something like "Boursin" brand cheese balls as hostess gifts or for parties. Five packets; each sets up to a gallon of milk. Interchangeable with Chevre. $6 Chevre Direct Set C20G Easy-Peasy! This culture is interchangeable with Fromage Blanc and can be used with either cows milk or goats milk. You'll get a rich and delicious creamy fresh cheese. Also great as a cheese spread on bagels. Five packets; each sets up to a gallon of milk. This culture includes rennet. $6 MT1 Specific blend for Feta $9 MA4001/ MA4002, 5 DCU size packet acidifying mesophilic with some gas production for open curd. Cheddar, Colby, Brick, Jack, Farmers, Limburger, Camembert, Brie, Blue cheese, Gouda, Edam, Havarti $10 Meso Aroma B Acid producing mesophilic with flavor and some gas production for open curd. Cream cheese, Sour cream, Quark, Cottage cheese, Fromage blanc, Chevre frais, St-Maure, Valencay, Cultured butter: 10g: $9 Meso Type II Acid producing mesophilic mainly useful for Cheddar, Colby, Brick, Jack, Farmers, Limburger, Camembert, Brie, Blue cheese Mozzarella, Provolone, Parmesan, Romano. 10g: $8 Meso Type III Acid plus flavor producer: Gouda, Edam, Havarti 10g: $8 SacM036 Acid producer. Use for Cheddar, Colby, Brick, Jack, Farmers, Limburger, Camembert, Brie, Blue cheese, Gouda, Edam, Havarti, Mozzarella, Provolone, Parmesan, Romano. $10 SacM030 Acid plus flavor producer: Cheddar, Colby, Brick, Jack, Farmers, Limburger, Camembert, Brie, Blue cheese. $10 SacM082 Strong acid producer with L bulgaricus; Buttermilk $10 Thermophilic Family Thermophilic Direct Set C2 Five individual packets each makes one quart of mother culture. (Italian culture.) Produces Mozzarella, Parmesan, Provolone, Swiss and other Itaian type cheeses. $6 Thermophilic Type C Acid plus flavor producer: good choice for Romano, Emmenthaler, Gruyere, Swiss 10g: $9 Specialty Cheeses Propionic Shermanii C6 (Swiss.) Produces the characteristic eyes (holes), aroma and flavor associated with Swiss, Gruyere, and Emmenthal cheeses. This culture must be used with C2 Thermophilic or another thermophilic culture. This culture cannot be re-cultured. $13 Bacteria Linens (red) C10 used in making surface-ripened "stinky cheeses" such as Brick, Brie, Limburger, and Muenster. (Kosher.) $13 Penicillium Candidum (White Mold) C8 is used to ripen and flavor Brie, Camembert, Colummiers, and a variety of French goat cheeses. This gives the chracteristic white surface mold. May be used in conjunction with Geotricum Candidum and/or with Penicillium Roquefort. $17 Geotricum Candidum C7 Can be used by itself or in conjunction with penicillium candidum to ripen and give flavor to Camembert, Brie, and a variety of goat cheeses. When used with penicillium candidum, it will prevent the skin from slipping off the cheese. Kosher. $20 Penicillium Roquefort (Blue) C9 Used to ripen, flavor and color blue, Gorgonzola, and Stilton. (kosher). Must be used with mesophilic. $25 Yogurt Cultures Bulgarian Yogurt (blue package) Y1 This is one of the healthiest yogurts for you, and it has the smoothest, creamiest and richest tasting yogurt we have ever found. Smooth and mild. Makes a firmer curd when working with raw milk. Can be recultured. $6 Tangy Yogurt Y4 (orange package) Package of five individual packets; each sets up to two quarts of milk into rich, creamy yogurt. This culture gives a tangy profile typical of Greek or Middle Eastern style yogurts. Can be drained for thicker texture. $6 Sweet Yogurt Y1 (white package) This probiotic yogurt culture will set up to two quarts of milk into a sweet and creamy yogurt, French or Northern European style. Contains both acidophilus and bifidus bacteria. Directions included. Five individual packets. $6 Mad Millie's Probiotic Yogurt Non-Dairy Cultures Water Kefir Grains WK100 Make delicious, pro-biotic non-dairy cultured "soft drinks." $17 San Francisco Sourdough Starter SS100 bread culture $13 Parisian Sourdough Starter for authentic French bread $13 Lipase and Rennet NECSC “L1 Sharp Lipase” This imparts a sharp edge to the cheese, along with the cheese flavor. Use it for cheese that you want to be sharp, such as a nice dry aged cheddar. $7 Mad Millie’s “Goat Lipase” This adds even more of a sharp edge to the cheese. It should work well for a low moisture cheese such as Romano or Parmesan or Engllish Cheddar, where you want that sharp bite $15 NECSC “L3 Mild” This adds a nice cheese flavor with less of a bite and is more suited to medium-bodied cheeses such a Jack, Colby, or American Cheddar. $7 Mad Millie’s “Calf Lipase” This is quite similar to the L3, adding only a modest bite and good for medium bodied cheeses and for fresh cheeses with considerable acidity such as cottage cheese. $9 Mad Millie’s “Lamb Lipase” The mildest lipase. It gives a nice cheese flavor with very little sharpness. Try it for buttery-flavored cheeses such as Goudas, Edams, or fresh cheeses with low acidity such as Neufchatel, and surpface-ripened cheeses such as Brie. $15 2-oz liquid Animal Rennet Most natural product, most neutral flavor. Highly recommended. Keeps for six months in thee refrigerator $7 2-oz liquid vegetable Rennet Has a slight bitter peptide flavor. Kosher. Vegan. Certified organic. Recommended if one of these factors are deal-breakers for you in using animal rennet. $7 10 tablets, vegetable rennet Very hard to work with, each tablet cultures 50 liters of milk. Must crush, precisely measure, and dissolve before adding to milk. Only recommended for extreme storage conditions: keeps five years in the freezer, two years in the refrigerator, six months at room temperature. $7 RENNETS. Two-ounce bottle of liquid rennet, either animal or vegetable, $7 each. Store these in the refrigerator for six months to a year. One-half teaspoon of either animal or vegetable rennet will set a curd in two to four gallons of milk in about 45 minutes. Sturdy Cheese Press, Amazingly well-made and well-priced. Made by a local retired high school physics teacher and woodworker. Best of all, he's done all the calculations for you -- you just choose the pressing pressure you want, then measure the appropriate number of cups of water to hang from the arm. Made in Oregon of Oregon fir. $85. For waxing and ageing your hard cheeses we offer several products: CHEESE WAX. Prevents unwanted mold growth and retains moisture in aging cheeses. One pound block of yellow, red, or black wax $6. (There is no performance difference between the different colors of wax, it is purely your aesthetic preference.) Nothing beats colored wax for an attractive, traditional appearance. MAD MILLIE "EVA" PLASTIC COATING. More durable, more moisture resistant than wax; clear and lets you SEE your cheese as it ages. Also safer to work with than hot wax; no risk of fire or burned fingers. $13 CHEESE WAX BRUSH for applying wax to cheese. Natural bristles stand up to the high temperature of melted wax $8. CHEESE WAX MELTING BOWL, metal bowl with snap-on lid, use over a pan of hot water and store your wax with no dust and no mess! $13 CURD KNIFE. Long, rounded 12-inch blade assures even cutting of the curds, rounded tip won't scratch your stainless steel pan, essential to the cheesemaking process for hard cheeses. $20. CURD CUTTING HARP, STAINLESS STEEL, first one we've ever seen that sells for less than $200! Ours is only $70. MOLDS for shaping your cheeses. Left to right: (1) Chevre, 3-in X 3-3/4 in, $6 each. (2) Couer a la creme, 4-in wide X 1-3/4-in tall, $6 each. (3) Large hard cheese mold with follower, 7-3/4-in wide X 8-in tall, $33. (4) small hard cheese mold with follower, 4-1/2-in tall, 5-in wide, $19. (5) Pyramid, 3-1/2-in wide, $6 each. (6) Saint Marcellin, 3-1/2-in wide, $6 each. Square feta mold $4. Round feta mold with brine bath $9. This is just a small sample of the 20+ different molds we offer. NATURAL BAMBOO MATS for air-drying cheeses, forming logs, and for turning and draining of camembert, coulommiers, and brie. Set of two mats, 9-in X 9-in, for $3. Or food-grade plastic mat, $3. Presentation Choices: CHEESE WRAP PAPERS for mold-ripened, soft, and washed-rind cheeses. Silver wrap, white wrap, or bleu cheese wrap, $11-$14 per box. Gives your cheese a professional look and extends its shelf life. WOODEN PRESENTATION BOXES, two sizes, $2 each. ASH is a food-grade charcoal used on some soft cheeses to neutralize and sweeten the surface, creating a friendly environment for the growth of penicillium candidum which inhibiting other unwanted mold growth. Create gorgeous veins inside your cheese, or gorgeous rinds outside. 10 oz cannister $16. CHEESECLOTH. Rikki Carroll's cheesecloth is by far the most durable, least lint-y cheesecloth we've ever seen. Butter muslin (for draining) or Cheesecloth (for lining molds) or nylon. Two square yards. $6. Cheesecloth draining bags, medium size, 10.5 in X 13 in, A sturdy drawstring allows you to easily hang and allow the cheese curds or whey to drain. Easily cleaned by rinsing and can be used over and over again. If you find regular cheesecloth a challenge, these bags are a great alternative. Tip: For easier use keep the seam on the outside when draining. TIP: for cleaning cheesecloth after cheesemaking, soak in water with baking soda and bleach added. The baking soda completely removes the cheese and milk residue! THERMOMETERS. We offer the "budget thermometer E4" as by far the best cheesemaking thermometer on the market. Long 12-inch stem, pot clip, and easy-to-read dial face. $16. Same thermometer with a 6-inch stem $10. Floating thermometer $9. Digital thermometer $10. Humidity and Temperature Monitor for your ageing environment, $16 pH Meter, crucial for good mozzarella and reproducible results for other cheeses. $49. Calibrating fluids pH=4 or pH=7, $4 each (2 oz) CHEESE PRESS PLAN. Do-it-yourself press plan, $5. CALCIUM CHLORIDE used with store-bought pasteurized milk to give a firmer set to curds. Can also be used in water for storing fresh mozzarella. Two ounce liquid bottle $5. CITRIC ACID, 8 oz powder $6 TARTARIC ACID. 4 oz powder $5 We offer five different lipase powders! WOW, that's a lot of lipase choices! How to choose? Tips on Choosing the Best Lipase for Your Cheesemaking Project By Mary Rosenblum for Kookoolan Farms Lipase is an enzyme that occurs naturally in raw milk but is killed in the pasteurization process. Lipase breaks down the butterfat in the milk into short chain and branched chain fatty acids. These fatty acids register as ‘flavor’ on our tongues and give cheese its ‘cheesy’ flavor. If you make cheese from pasteurized milk and do not add lipase, your cheese will taste more like cottage cheese than cheddar or gouda, even if those are the recipes you use. If you want to amplify these flavors, you can add lipase to your recipe even when using raw milk to make cheese. You can also use different lipases with the same milk to get different flavors, even making cow’s milk taste more like goat’s milk or sheep’s milk! Several types of lipase are available, each one imparting a subtly different flavor profile to your cheese: New England Cheesemaking Supply Co. “L1 Sharp Lipase (Capilase)” $7. This imparts a sharp edge to the cheese, along with the cheese flavor. Use it for cheese that you want to be sharp, such as a nice dry aged cheddar. Mad Millie’s “Goat Lipase” $15. This adds even more of a sharp edge to the cheese. It should work well for a low moisture cheese such as romano or parmesan where you want that sharp bite or a nice English cheddar. New England Cheesemaking Supply Co. “L3 Mild (Italase)” $7. This adds a nice cheese flavor with less of a bite and is more suited to medium bodied cheeses such as jack or Colby or an American cheddar. Mad Millie’s “Calf Lipase” $8.50. This is quite similar to the L3, adding only a modest bite and good for medium bodied cheeses and for fresh cheeses with considerable acidity such as cottage cheese. Mad Millie’s “Lamb Lipase” $15. This is the mildest of the lipases. It gives a nice cheese flavor with very little sharpness. Try it for buttery flavored cheeses such as goudas, edams, or fresh cheeses with low acidity, such as Neufchatel as well as with surface ripened cheeses such as Brie. CHEESE SALT. This salt is milled to a very fine flake. Dissolves easily, even in drained soft butter, does not cake up, contains no iodide. 8 ounce package for $3. BOOKS. "HOME CHEESEMAKING" by Rikki Carroll, the "cheese queen." New and totally revised and updated and twice the size from the original edition. Contains more than 75 cheese recipes and more than 25 recipes for other home dairy products. The classic best seller and ideal first book for home cheesemakers. $17. "200 Easy Homemade Cheese Recipes" by Debra Amrein-Boyes, $25, highly recommended for intermediate cheesemakers "AMERICAN FARMSTEAD CHEESE" by Paul Kindstedt. A more advanced cheesemaking book, with discussions on history, differences in milk characteristics, culture, process, chemistry, aging, and an emphasis on acid production and testing. $42 "THE FABRICATION OF FARMSTEAD GOAT CHEESE" by Jean-Claude Le Jaouen. Considered by many to the the "bible" of goat cheesemaking. Includes working plans for laying out a cheese room, and description of over 70 varieties of goat cheese. 206 pages, for the advanced cheesemaker. List price $22.95, we offer it for $20. "The Cheesemaker's Manual" by Margaret Morris, founder of Glengarry Creamery. This book is very hard to use unless you can find Glengarry's specialty cultures -- which we do also carry. A much more sophisticated book for when you've outgrown Ricki Carroll's excellent introductory book. $45. We also have her DVD. "The Complete Idiot's Guide to Cheesemaking," $20. Classic "Kosikowski" college-level textbook, 2-volume set, $75. Making Artisan Cheeses Culture Magazine, $10 per issue, many to choose from. Please see our Classes and Events page for upcoming cheesemaking classes!
Available Now
Jan 1st ~ Dec 31st
Chicken 4.59 / lb.
Summary Check our website for details (www.kookoolanfarms.com). In 2012 our pasture-raised poultry season will run from the beginning of May through the end of October. Note that in order to have chickens for the winter, you’ll want your freezer to be fully stocked up before the end of October (September recommended as October chickens sell out quickly with people stocking up for winter.) All of our poultry is pasture-raised. Available fresh weekly at our farmstore in Yamhill, fresh every Tuesday starting May 1, 2012. Available fresh weekly at all Oregon New Seasons Markets meat cases, fresh every Friday starting May 4, 2012. Available fresh and frozen every OTHER week directly from Kookoolan Farms at the Hillsdale Farmers Market, Sundays 10am to 2pm beginning Sunday May 6, 2012. We will kill our last chicken on the year on October 30, 2012, after which no more fresh chickens will be available until approximately May 1, 2013. Whole chickens are $4.59/pound (same price everywhere) New Seasons can special order other chicken parts: Feet $2.50/lb in 5-lb bags Necks $3/lb in 5-lb bags Livers OR hearts $3/lb in one-pound deli containers Gizzards, $5/lb In 2012 we’ll also have Pekin Ducks, and hand-raised 4H rabbits available fresh weekly. 2012 2012 is our seventh year of farming, and our fifth year as a licensed and inspected poultry processor. We believe that we have done an excellent job of bringing pastured poultry to Portland, and we appreciate very much that so many of you think so too. Another aspect of what we've accomplished is a large amount of research on the status and history of American poultry production over the last hundred years. We have learned that "ethical and sustainable" farming, especially as applied to livestock farming, is not "black or white," but rather a continuum. And not just one continuum, but several: housing, genetics, chick procurement, feeding, handling, slaughtering, and processing, are each a continuum, as are the human and financial sustainability aspects of “sustainable farming.” More than once, we have completely reinvented our farm, its practices, and its offerings. Where do you Buy Your Chickens? In times past, pasture-raised poultry would have been the norm. Until the 1960s, the intensive factory farming methods we know today simply hadn’t been heard of. Then, some farmers started to raise their animals intensively in order to increase output. To compete, others followed and the rest is history. Have we now reached a point where intensive farming is an inevitability or is it possible to turn the clock back and find another way? Some farmers have already done so. The difference in their pasture-reared poultry and the birds churned out by intensive, industrial farms is huge. Pasture raised poultry is tastier, more nutritious and of course, much more ethical. Industrial Poultry Industrial poultry is raised in huge-scale industrial facilities. They truly are factories, rather than barns or anything we might associate with traditional farming. They are concentrated in just 15 states, and there are only 27,000 producers of poultry in the whole country. That is a 98% drop from the number there were 50 years ago, when there were 1.6 million producers nationwide. The average broiler chicken sold in US supermarkets today will have come from a farm which raises around 600,000 chickens each year. Our appetite for cheap chicken is huge, with 9 billion being eaten a year, compared to 580 million 50 years ago. What problems does farming on this scale and at these kinds of densities create? It harms both the birds and the environment around them. In order to meet our huge demand for chicken, industrial farmers have used breeding and growth drugs to help reduce the time it takes to raise a bird by almost half (naturally, it takes 84 days on average, now it is down to just 45 in confinement – 63 days at Kookoolan Farms). These drugs are harmful, giving the birds some nasty health problems, as their bodies grow faster than their hearts can support. They suffer chronic pain, leg defects and heart failure. The conditions they are kept in add to their problems. With only around 130 square inches each, they cannot move around properly and are subject to stress and disease; in confinement most poultry is treated with antibiotics, usually hidden from consumers by injecting a long-acting antibiotic into the egg the day before the chick hatches. All those chickens in one place creates an awful lot of mess. That mess has to go somewhere. The manure and waste products from the industrial farms end up in the fields in higher concentrations than the land can absorb, and from there is washed into streams and rivers, polluting them. Pasture-Raised Poultry Pasture-raised poultry is kept very differently. It is a natural, seasonal, ethical product. Chickens are raised on natural grass pastures, perhaps with barns or shelters that they are free to wander in and out of as they choose. They can peck, dig, scratch and generally do what chickens do. They are not forced to grow faster than their bodies can handle. They do not produce mountains of waste products: their waste is a natural part of the life cycle and is easily absorbed by the earth they live in due to lower stocking densities and periods of rest for the pasture between batches of birds. They will generally be fed on higher-quality grain rations, rather than on poor quality commercial feed mixes. They live as close to the way that wild chickens will live as possible. Chickens raised like this cost more than those raised intensively, as do the eggs from chickens raised this way. These products are also not available all year-round. Chickens raised indoors in barns are not seasonal because their living conditions are removed completely from the seasons. Pasture-raised chickens are born over the spring and summer, although of course, they can (and should!) be frozen for use over winter. In the past, most food was seasonal. Just as certain fruits are only around during the summer months, so various meats are only naturally grown at certain times of year. As well as being much more ethical, pasture raised poultry is healthier and tastier than industrial poultry. Both meat and eggs from industrial birds are lower in certain nutrients than those raised in pasture. They are often bruised and damaged from being kept in confinement, and can be prone to parasitic infection. The industrial farming industry has removed most of us from the natural life cycles of our own foods. We can produce anything we want, whenever we want it. The question we should ask is whether the low cost of cheap chicken is worth the high cost in suffering, taste and sustainability. ---- Jenny Halligan is a freelance writer from England who writes mostly about drug addiction facilities and resources. She also believes strongly in other good causes such as organic produce and has everything from an organic mattress to organic carrots at home. She wrote this piece particularly for Kookoolan Farms. Thanks Jenny! Free-Range Poultry Housing We start our young chicks indoors for about the first 4 to 6 weeks of their lives, depending on the weather: longer early and late in the season, shorter in the warmest months of the summer. For the last 2 to 5 weeks of their lives, our chickens live outdoors on fresh grass pastures. The outdoors birds are a joy to watch. They require protection from predators (especially at night) and continuous access to fresh water and food, but these chores are completed twice a day, with more frequent checks on the very hottest days of summer or during periods of rainstorms or other harsher weather. On hot sunny days, chickens need shade. We have used portable tarps, portable hoophouses covered with shade cloth, and wooden portable houses covered with roofing. Each of these structures is lightweight and portable, and can quickly and easily be moved from a “used up” section of pasture to fresh clean grass. In this way, the manure load is spread over the entire pasture, resulting in lush, deeply fertilized pasture grass. Each section of the pasture has a substantial rest period before chickens are returned to that section – this interrupts disease cycles and keeps our soil and poultry flocks disease-free. Numerous studies have shown that birds raised outdoors on pasture have higher levels of Omega-3 compared to Omega-6 fatty acids; higher levels of Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA, a cancer-fighting agent) and vitamins including Vitamin D which the chickens produce themselves when they are exposed to sunlight, just like we do. Local Yamhill wheat field Huge harvest of conventionally-raised grains. A butchered Kookoolan Farms chickens. Feeding -- Organic vs. conventional All of our housing and raising practices qualify as certified organic; all of our slaughtering and packing plant practices are completely chemical-free and could be certified organic. Our pastures have never been treated with any synthetic fertilizers, herbicides, or pesticides. Here the term "organic" really just refers to the absence of chemicals. We have raised a few batches of chickens on certified organic feed, and a few batches even on soy-free, corn-free certified organic feed. While these projects supplied food to a niche market who was willing to pay a premium, the size of that niche is too small to provide our family with an income. And the more we dig into sourcing certified organic animal feeds, the more we became convinced that in general this is actually NOT an ethical choice for us, even if more folks were willing to pay for it. Most commercial chicken feed is conventionally raised corn and soy, which means most of it comes from monoculture corporate-owned factory farms in the Midwest, using chemical fertilizers, herbicides and pesticides. At best these are high-producing hybrids which require large amount of fertilizers for their high yields; virtually all of them now are GMO varieties. The Mississippi, Ohio, and Missouri Rivers drain the bulk of America's bread basket, pouring millions of pounds of chemicals into the Gulf of Mexico. The unnaturally high levels of phosphorus cause algae to flourish, sucking oxygen away from native plants and animals and causing "hypoxia". "Organic" commodity grains are mostly imported into the U.S. rather than grown domestically; most come from China and Brazil. These grains come to Oregon through the commodity market, using large amounts of fossil fuels for shipment by barge, train, and truck. Chinese organic grains are of questionable certification and prone to containing unauthorized ingredients; Brazilian grains may be grown without chemicals, but the soil fertility comes from unsustainable slash-and-burn agriculture of the Amazon basin. Also, "certified organic" just means the absence of chemicals; lower-quality certified organic grain by-products rather than higher-quality whole grains are often used in certified organic animal feeds. Organic feeds can be as much as twice as expensive as conventional feeds, and not necessarily of better or even equal nutritional quality for the birds. But even if there were a large enough market, we’re not happy with the non-transparency of origin, questionable labor and environmental practices, and high fossil fuel requirements associated with commodity grains grown on a different continent. There exist the beginnings of locally grown, organic grains and poultry feeds which we are happy to see, and we use these on a limited basis as a portion of our poultry flock’s overall ration. Our feed is milled locally with ingredients that are preferentially sourced locally whenever available. Handling, Slaughtering, and Processing This part we do exceptionally well. At Kookoolan Farms, "trucking to slaughter" involves a 200-yard-long, two-minute tractor ride. Our birds undergo minimal handling stress, are killed humanely and with respect, and are processed cleanly, chilled rapidly, and delivered fresh to our customers. We handle our birds so gently that 95% of the chickens we process are sold as fancy-quality (absolutely blemish-free with no bruises, dislocations, or broken bones) whole broiler/fryers: the evidence of their gentle handling is right there in the perfect carcass in front of you. However, and this probably is not a surprise to any of you, killing chickens, burying their offals for compost, and cleaning the slaughterhouse are not our favorite farm chores. So we only process 300 chickens a week, only one day a week, only five months of the year. Other days we’re busy with milking cows, making mead and kombucha, growing and harvesting vegetables, offering cheesemaking classes, and going to the Hillsdale Farmer’s Market. This balance of work is important for keeping our farm humanly sustainable for our family and our workers. Summary Thanks for your attention to this rather-too-long email. Please buy our chickens at New Seasons Markets – go to the meat counter and ask for a Kookoolan Farms pasture-raised chiken! We also hope to see you at the Hillsdale Farmer's Market (www.hillsdalefarmersmarket.com) – we’ll be there every other Sunday starting May 6, 2012 -- and at our farmstore at our little farm just ourside the town of Yamhill (if it’s your first visit, please call ahead for an appointment, 503-730-7535). Everything we offer for sale excepting raw cow’s milk can be had at the Hillsdale Farmer’s Market. We remain committed to using the best, most natural farming practices and raising the best-quality foods for our family and for yours. In good health, Chrissie and Koorosh Zaerpoor Kookoolan Farms, Yamhill, Oregon April 3, 2012
Available in 2 months
May 1st ~ Oct 31st
Chicken Eggs 6 / dozen
Available Now
Jan 1st ~ Dec 31st
Duck 6 / lb.
Available in 3 months
Jun 1st ~ Aug 31st
Eggs (Chicken) 6 / dozen
Available Now
Jan 1st ~ Dec 31st
Free Range Eggs 6 / dozen
Available Now
Jan 1st ~ Dec 31st
Goose 6 / lb.
Available in 7 months
Oct 1st ~ Dec 15th
Kombucha 4 / bottle ORGANIC
If you've experienced the commercial kombuchas sold as soft drinks, then you are familiar with the way-too-sour, way-too-sweet, way-too-vinegary compromise required to legally sell kombucha as a soft drink. Natural, Real Kombucha is gently alcoholic at 1.5% alcohol. However, in the United States, soft drinks must contain 0.5% or less alcohol by volume. Anyone who has had an opened bottle of wine spoil in their kitchen knows that if you leave alcohol exposed to the air, the alcohol with chemically react with the oxygen, converting some of the alcohol to acetic acid (which is vinegar). By extending the kombucha "fermentation" to 30 days or more, the alcohol is removed from the kombucha by converting it to vinegar. The resulting brew has its sugar and acid out of balance, requiring the addition of more sugar; and has nasty vinegar off-flavors which need to be masked by the addition of aromatics such as fruit and herbal essences. Believe it or not, some commercial kombuchas are also pasteurized for shelf stability, killing off all the probiotic cultures! Available now at Kookoolan Farms farmstore in Yamhill; at Mainbrew Beer and Homebrew Supply in Hillsboro, at People's Co-Op Grocery in Southeast Portland, and at Harvest Fresh Grocery in McMinnville. More retail locations soon! At our farmstore a 22-oz bottle is $4, or case of 12 for $44. Buy Kombucha online, we ship anywhere!
Available Now
Jan 1st ~ Dec 31st
Lamb 8 / lb.
Available in 3 months
Jun 1st ~ Nov 30th
Pork 5.25 / lb.
Kookoolan Farms is very proud to be working with three different premium growers to offer you three very different pork choices. With every 1/2 pig, 1/2 lamb, or 1/8th beef purchase, a copy of The Grassfed Gourmet Cookbook is our free gift to you. OPTION 1: “Red Wattles” heirloom-breed, 100% pasture-raised pork. NEW: AVAILABLE RIGHT NOW! 100% pasture-raised heritage pork with near-instant gratification! Kookoolan Farms is delighted to add a new farmer-partner to our loose co-op of micro-farmers. We now have heritage-breed, 100% pasture raised RED WATTLES pork, (this breed is listed on the Slow Foods Ark of Taste and is considered to be truly exceptional in meat quality and flavor). Jim and Wendy raise the pigs on grass pasture from age 2 days through slaughter. (Pigs are omnivores like humans and chickens, and so require grain and protein supplement to grass; unlike cattle and sheep, pigs cannot live on grass alone.) These pigs have better quality meat when the carcass is a little bigger; we're shooting for hanging weights of 80 to 100 pounds. $5.25 per pound processed hanging weight, all-inclusive price includes kill fee, disposal fee, cut, wrap, cure, and smoke, no extra or hidden charges. Next availability late April 2012. Reserving now for all months in 2012. $50 deposit at time of reservation. This is our newest partner-farm, and we expect to have a number of pasture-raised, Red Wattles pigs available just about every month in 2012. We have two processing options: we can custom-kill on the farm using Ben's Custom Cutting in Dayton with nitrate-free curing, or we can use a USDA processor in Mount Angel, Oregon: the only slaughterhouse on the West Coast that is Animal Welfare Approved. This option gives you USDA carcass inspection and the option for having skin-on, trotters, tails, ears, and jowls; however because it is a USDA inspected plant this option will not do nitrate-free curing (however we can take your pork belly and hams to Ben's and have them nitrate-free cured there for you). By using this USDA facility, Kookoolan Farms will now be able to offer individual cuts of pork as cash-and-carry in our farmstore and at the farmer's market as a great way for you to try pasture-raised pork with a smaller initial investment. OPTION 2: Local Yamhill farmer Stacy operates what she proudly and affectionately calls her "boutique swinery." Stacy's heirloom-breed Berkshire pigs are truly pampered from their first day to their last. We have eight animals to offer at this time, all born in late January 2012, ready to butcher in June, and meat ready to pick up after curing and smoking about late July. Pigs are available by the half- or whole-carcass only, and will be cut and processed to your specification. No-msg, no-nitrate smoking available on request, no additional charge. SOLD OUT until sometime in the winter of 2012-13. We feed a locally milled grain consisting primarily of wheat, oats, and soy (no corn) that includes vitamins and minerals appropriate for pigs. Our market pigs are free-fed to their content on a 20% protein of this ration. Our sow feed is similar but at a 15% protein blend. This feed is custom made for us by Marion Ag in McCoy. In addition to this, we give our pigs grass hay in the winter along with "stall snacks" of oats, apples, nuts - never slops, old food, or scraps. Right now the piglets and their mothers are mostly in the barn in large open stalls for about another week, they do have a patio off their stall to go outside, but are not yet on dirt. Around March 1, the sows and piglets will have access to a large dirt paddock behind the barn, I expect this will be when the three litters are introduced to each other and become a herd again. As the ground firms in our pastures, this herd will make day trips into different areas of the pasture until they are turned out for good in the spring. From then on, they will be pasture pigs that rotate fields about every two weeks until their butcher date. Our primary focus is the quality of life for our pigs - we do all we can to ensure they have both a warm, dry area for sleeping and eating that can also support their need to root on wet days when they prefer to be in, and a large area to work in when they prefer to be out. Close behind this is stewardship of the land - a challenge with pastured pigs! As mentioned, we rotate pastures throughout the growing season and rest the main pastures during the "wet" season. We also shut down areas of our pastures for 18 months which we use to dump barn litter during the winter and then leave alone for 12 months. This not only rests the soil, but rebuilds organic material and reduces compaction in high use areas. This summer I am working with the Soil & Water Conservation District to create a heavy use area around our barn to reduce mud created in high traffic areas of our winter paddock. Our project for last summer was a new barn that sports solar panels - Stacy's farm electricity is entirely solar generated! Offered: six heirloom-breed Berkshire pigs, by half or whole carcass, $5 per pound processed hanging weight, about 75 pounds per half-pig. This is an all-inclusive price that includes kill fee, processing, smoking, cut/wrap fee. Your pig will be custom-cut and custom-processed any way you wish. Total price about $375 per half depending on the animal's actual weight. To reserve yours, call Farmer Chrissie at (503) 730-7535 or email. ------------- Option 3: "Regular" pampered pork. Season is April/May through November each year. April sold out. May sold out. June sold out. July sold out. Currently reserving for September 2012. This is our premium, pampered pork, raised on deep clean bedding (no wire floors or farrowing crates) in the cleanest, sweetest-smelling pig barn I’ve ever seen, bright and airy. The pigs are of no particular pedigree, being the result of about 30 years of continuous pork production by this small family farm, and the breeders having been selected for good hardiness on this particular farm, and for good bacon. The pigs are fed a high quality grain, nut, and fruit based diet with minimal access to grass pasture. $4.50/lb hanging weight, about 75 pounds hanging weight = about 60 pounds finished weight per half pig, about $325 total finished cost. Sold out for April. Sold out for May. Sold out for June. Sold out for July. Currently reserving for August 2012. Most economical choice. Offered: ½ carcass pork, $4.50 per pound processed hanging weight, corresponding to about $325 total cost for about 75 pounds hanging weight. This becomes approximately 60 pounds of finished, cut, wrapped, labeled and frozen meat. $50 deposit required, reservation must be placed while the animal is still alive. Next availability: about August 2012, reserving now, you can either call Chrissie on 503-730-7535, or email [email protected] Deposit may be paid by check payable to Kookoolan Farms, or with your credit card.
Available Now
Jan 1st ~ Dec 31st
Rabbit 10 / lb.
Available in 2 months
May 1st ~ Oct 31st
Raw Bottled Honey 11 / pint
Our honey is from hives located just three and a half miles from our farm on Mount Richmond, just north of Yamhill. Available each year from about September until it sells out. Only about 10 cases of one-pint jars produced each year. $11/pint includes a $3 fully-refundable bottle deposit, i.e. $8 for honey plus $3 for jar deposit = $11 total price.
Available in 6 months
Sep 1st ~ Dec 31st
Raw Milk 12 / gallon
Kookoolan Farms complies with all applicable laws regarding the sale of raw milk. In Oregon raw cow's milk may legally be bought only at the farm where it is produced, provided the farm has three or fewer lactating cows on the premises and provided the farm does not advertise or solicit raw milk sales. This statement is for public information only and is not an advertisement or solicitation.
Available Now
Jan 1st ~ Dec 31st
Turkey 7 / lb.
TURKEY. We raise Red Bourbon heritage breed turkeys, genetically very close to wild turkeys. For 2012 we have only 150 birds, only for Thanksgiving (although obviously you could buy at Thanksgiving and freeze for Christmas). You will be stunned by the taste and texture difference. “Oh! So this is why our forefathers invented Thanksgiving!” Your typical frozen grocery store butterball turkeys are 12-16 weeks old at the time of slaughter. Red Bourbons are 40 weeks old at the time of harvest. Red Bourbons can fly, and prefer to sleep high in the trees at night – even mature males that way more than 20 pounds. Red Bourbons are active foragers, requiring extensive grazing areas. All of these factors make them more expensive to raise, but there is no better meat for Thanksgiving. $7/pound for hens, finishing 8-11 pounds. $6/lb for toms, finishing 16-20 pounds. As of February 2012, we have only about 50 remaining turkeys for Thanksgiving 2012. You will need to specify at time of reservation: pickup at Hillsdale Farmer's Market on Sunday, November 18, 2012; or pickup at our farm in Yamhill on Tuesday, November 20, 2012. No Wednesday pickups. We also ask for a deposit of $50 at the time you make the reservation.
Available in 9 months
Nov 18th ~ Nov 20th
Veal 8 / lb.
Available in 6 months
Sep 1st ~ Sep 30th
Vin De Noix (Green Walnut Wine) 28 / bottle
Vin de Noix is an ancient, traditional French aperitif or dessert wine made by steeping the unripe walnut fruits in a combination of red wine and brandy. Our version is made with red wine from Montinore Estates: the grapes are certified organic and Demeter certified biodynamic. Christian Brothers brandy used at one part per five parts of wine. Certified organic cane sugar, organic vanilla beans, orange peel, and cloves are also added. All is macerated and allowed to steep and blend for about four months, then solids strained out and the wine bottled. The result is smooth, mellow, aromatic, rich dark mahogany in color, and unlike anything modern.
Available Now
Jan 1st ~ Dec 1st